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March 17, 2022

Low latency High Speed Broadband With Better Broadband Infrastructure

The following transcript has been edited for length and readability. Listen to the entire discussion here on The Broadband Bunch. The Broadband Bunch is sponsored by ETI Software.

In this episode, we chat with Dennis Kyle, SVP Product Marketing, the Zayo Group.

Dennis shares with us what lies ahead not only for the Zayo Group but also for the entire broadband industry

  • Origination to till date – The Zayo story
  • Fiber Broadband Network and Data Center Expansion
  • Telecom Technology Then and Now
  • Edge Technology Manifestation & Problem Solving
  • Broadband Infrastructure and Telehealth
  • Broadband Infrastructure and 5G

Brad:

Welcome to The Broadband Bunch, a podcast about broadband and how it impacts us all. Join us to learn about the state of the industry and the latest innovations and trends. Connect with the thought leaders, pioneers, and policymakers helping to shape your future through broadband.

This episode of The Broadband Bunch is sponsored by ETI Software, your zero-touch automation experts. By, simplifying, exciting, and growing. By DxTEL, creators of the Harper Broadband Marketing Library. By ITK Solutions Group, the process first, technology second, and by UTOPIA Fiber, building a more connected nation.

Hi everyone in broadband land, this is your host, Brad Hine. Welcome to another episode of The Broadband Bunch. Our guest this week has over 20 years of leadership experience in telecommunications and technology-related industries. He currently serves as senior vice president of product marketing with Zayo Group, where he and his team are responsible for driving product engagement and growth across all of North America.

Earlier in his career, he held leadership positions at Silicon Valley-funded startups in the IoT and connected devices space. He’s held leadership positions at companies such as Mac McCaw Cellular, NextLink Interactive, XO Communications, and Level 3 Communications. And also had a previous stint at Zayo Group, where he ran with full P&L responsibility across 11 states and Western Canada. And sales and marketing positions to affect Zayo’s global growth objectives across various sectors, such as healthcare and education. He’s a bachelor of science in industrial engineering from Northwestern University, as well as an MBA and MA in development economics from Stanford University. Please join me in welcoming today’s guest from Zayo Group, Dennis Kyle. Dennis, welcome to the show.

Dennis Kyle:

Hey, good to be here. It’s snowing here in Boulder, Colorado. Don’t know where it is where you are, but glad to be here for sure.

Brad:

Oh, wow. I’m in Atlanta, the sun is shining. I don’t think we’ve seen the sun in three months, so all is well.

Dennis Kyle:

Good. That’s great.

Brad:

Man, as a fellow technology junkie, Dennis, especially with broadband networks and connected devices, I’ve got to admit, I was a bit jealous looking through your resume. Got a lot of cool experiences.

Dennis Kyle:

It’s been a fun ride. Certainly not done yet, but I always used to say if computers and networks went away, I’d have nothing to do. But since that doesn’t seem to be the case, I am managing to keep myself busy.

Brad: 

Great to hear, great to hear you. Reading through your resume and all the things you’ve touched in technology, it reminded me of that Johnny Cash song, I’ve been everywhere. You’ve been everywhere, man. I was like, wow.

Dennis Kyle:

I’ll take it.

Origination to till date – The Zayo story

Brad: 

There you go. Well, I wanted to start off a little bit with you telling us a little bit about Zayo and currently where you guys are at. Tell our listeners a little bit about what Zayo’s been doing since their origination.

Dennis Kyle: 

Zayo got started, Circa 2007 or so. And founded by our CEO, Dan Caruso, and a few other folks. The thought process was that there’s a need for fiber and there’s an opportunity for a company like Zayo to take fiber assets that are out there. That we used to call them in the old days, I’m not sure this is entirely in Vogue, but it paints the picture, of fiber orphans. So, companies that had assets, but were disassociated from each other and didn’t have necessarily a national or, even in some cases, a regional footprint. Over the course of the first seven, eight years, Zayo amassed these assets through several acquisitions.

I think the total is well over 40, and took these fiber orphans, and brought them into the family, so to speak. And created Zayo as a pan-North American and European entity with deep, rich fiber assets, both in metropolitan areas and then what we describe from a long-haul perspective. Then with those assets, we’ve continued to layer additional products and services on top of those assets. So, you offer transport services, ethernet services, and IP services. And now most recently, through another series of acquisitions, we are focused on what we would call the edge. We have the underlying assets and we’ve got the products and services that sit on top of them deploying across various parts of the network.

Fiber Broadband Network and Data Center Expansion.

Brad:

Wow. As I look at our first discussion that you and I had, maybe it was a little over a month ago. Looking through your fiber map online, your fiber route miles, and all the on-net data centers. Can you talk a little bit about that expansiveness, where you guys are located, and where you’re targeting the globe?

Dennis Kyle:

I mentioned North America, the United States, Canada, and Europe. But when you then take that and you put all those numbers together, you end up with astounding metrics. 13 million-plus fiber miles, 134,000 route miles, connectivity to 370 plus, what we call cloud on-ramps. The AWS, the Google Clouds, those types of things. Over 40,000 buildings that we are connected to. Then 4,000 plus data centers. So, compelling statistics underlie the capability, depth, and reach of the network. And then somewhat, tongue in cheek, we like to describe ourselves as, we’re not the phone company, we are focused on what’s next and we deliver a ton of capability that enables your business.

Brad:

Very cool. Can you talk a little bit about exactly what your group does now? I introduced you as senior VP for product marketing, what are your teams… In a more detailed way, what are your teams responsible for across North America?

Dennis Kyle:

When you think about it, those products and services that layer on top of those fiber assets have different target markets for different customers. So, if you’re a healthcare customer, if you are a transportation customer or a manufacturing customer, and you also are looking to buy potential services like ethernet or IP, our job is to connect the dots, is a phrase I often use. Between what we build here at Zayo and the solution sets that the customers are looking for.

So, taking something that would otherwise be technology and coming up and making sure that we present the appropriate value proposition to that customer, to that industry. The appropriate messaging to that customer, to that industry. And then also really nail the strategy because most of our customers aren’t looking for just a point solution. They’re looking for a set of solutions over time. So, we’re the glue, if you will, between the company itself and the marketplace, to make sure that we’re communicating to the customers in a way that they want to hear, can understand, grasp onto quickly and see value in. And it’s something that Zayo hasn’t always done, but in the last couple of years has really benefited from our customers as well.

Brad:

Wonderful. Tell our listeners a little bit about how you got involved in technology, maybe going back into your high school or college years. What initially got you involved and got you curious about jumping into all that?

Dennis Kyle:

Wow. Well, that’s going way back. Like many folks, I’ve always been inherently interested in technology. Not everybody is, but I always have been. I graduated from Northwestern with an engineering degree, so I guess I’d manifested that bent or that mindset. Initially graduated and worked for IBM for a few years, back in what was there, I didn’t know it at the time, but essentially their computer and telephony business. Now, it was defined tremendously differently back then, but that’s what it was. Then I went on to Stanford Business School. And when I had an opportunity to pick a place to work coming out of school, with all the maturity of a fresh graduate from MBA school, I thought, hey, working from McCaw Cellular, which most folks would know, maybe even still today is branded as Cellular One.

Over time, through a lot of the mergers and acquisitions that took place in telecommunications, it ultimately became AT&T Wireless, which now everybody knows. But at the time it was McCaw Cellular. I thought it would be a great way to keep in touch with my friends that I’d now made across the globe as having attended Stanford Business School. So, that was part of my super-mature motivation for joining them fresh out of graduate school. Then I’ve obviously found it to be super-enthralling and engaging and I stayed with it ever since. Moving from wireless, which is what McCaw was, to wireline in the form of NextLink and XO, then ultimately to fiber and the like through Level 3, and then have continued down that path. You could never say you quite planned it all out, but you can say it at least fit my disposition, who I was. And one thing led to another over time. Some of it serendipity, some of it luck, some of it planning.

Telecom Technology Then and Now

Brad:

Wow. In all your stops and stints and the different companies, you talked little about Silicon Valley. What do you see has changed the most over those years in telecommunications technology, since you started all the way through today? What are some of the biggest changes that you’ve witnessed?

Dennis Kyle: 

Oh boy. A lot has changed back and forth, and then… All of this sounds, I don’t know, so common or what you’d expect, and then a lot stays the same. But the rate at which we are absorbing telecommunications, the rate at which we are interacting with each other has just increased 100-fold. I can paint a picture and say that the first McCaw Cellular phone that we had back in the day was driven by the need for folks to communicate to each other more readily. I don’t think anyone would’ve, at the time, envisioned that turning into the iPhone we have today. Where not only do we communicate via voice but through a whole bunch of other methodologies as well, with apps on our phones and the like.

I remember back in the day when we were first getting internet access and you dialed it up and it was super-important, super-exciting. Today, where you have that same type of access, except it’s always on and you can get a gig speed into and out of your home. So, tremendous change driving and trying to satiate the continued need that we all have for interaction, for reaching applications, reaching data. And the internet itself has only propelled that and continues to propel that at an insatiable curve and at an insatiable rate.

Brad:

Totally agree. What’s interesting and what I’ve seen, and I’ll back up a couple of years. In 2020, I was at a conference on the West Coast. During the second day of that conference, my wife called me and said, “Hey, sounds like the schools are shutting down for a couple of days or maybe over the weekend, the government’s going to figure this out.” COVID had hit everybody, we didn’t know we were going in for weeks and months after that. But what I had seen in the industry is innovation and evidence that we could all work remote, that we needed faster networks to serve the home, and things like that. But I feel like the shift that COVID forced us into, forced us into trying to figure that out over a very short period. Describe a little bit of that time in your world and maybe some of the objectives and projects that came across your desk to make that transition much quicker. But probably knowing that innovation was already there, we just needed to tap into it.

Dennis Kyle:  

There are lots that could be said about that, some of it scar tissue, for sure. I’d say, to a large degree, many of us had connectivity in our homes. Not everybody, that clearly is where the somewhat of the sore point of the digital divide came from and persists today. That’s its own subject, but the transition to home, to your point, did have to take place very quickly. And for those of us who were in telecommunications, there was a lot of work behind the scenes. An example I remember very vividly, we were certainly aware of Zoom as a primary work-from-home tool that we’ve used, and certainly other ones as well. But if you were in their shoes, suddenly you had this exponential jump in the need for capacity and capability. And therefore, you turned to your suppliers, like Zayo. In a matter of days, not more than that… I remember a scene where it was a route between Seattle and Vancouver, BC that needed to be overhauled and capacity increased. I think we ended up having to do it in 24 or 48 hours.

Brad:

Oh, wow.

Dennis Kyle:

So, you could take those firefights, as I call them, multiply them times 1000 or even 10,000. Across the country, the telecommunications backbone providers, like Zayo, burst into flames to add more capacity into the network to support things like Zoom for folks who suddenly were working from home. That’s not to mention the last mile providers who were bringing connectivity into the home, who also had to do work on their part, because while I had a gig at home or whatever it may have been, and my neighbor did, there was no expectation that we’d all be on at the same time. So, the cable-cos, the telcos that have that last mile into the home suddenly had to burst into flames as well, to get that resolved. The amazing part though is American ingenuity.

The drive, the push to accomplish got that done, I’m going to say for the most part, inside 30 days. It continued to grow and ramp as it became more and more prevalent, and we became more and more clear that we were going to be here for a while. I remember trying to have a team meeting in Houston, Texas. It was one of those play-by-play scenarios. And by the end of day two, day three realized this just wasn’t right, just wasn’t going to happen. I never took another trip for the next two years and worked from home starting that week, fired up the Zoom, and off to the races.

Brad:  

Isn’t that amazing? That’s just amazing.

Dennis Kyle: 

Absolutely amazing. So, I got to see both sides. I literally got to see both sides. It’s like, God, we’ve got to get that link up. We’ve got to triple the capacity; we’ve got to do it yesterday. And I’m glad someone else did it here because it’s working for me at home. So, I got to participate on both sides.

Brad:

Now, it was specifically interesting in that time, I remember in the weeks that followed, my phone would just blow up being involved in many technology products and projects with vendors and partners in the business. People needed you to solve things quickly, people needed visibility into their footprint. They needed connectivity; they needed more bandwidth. Everything was trying to be done through the home. And we started to get into… What I think our audience would really like to learn a little bit more about is kind of… And I know we could probably talk for hours on this, but edge technology, edge computing, what it is, and how that has weighed into that variable of trying to hyper-scale everything overnight.

Dennis Kyle: 

Sure, this is a new one, that’s still being defined. I would make the following. Zayo’s network if I can say this… It’s a minor advertisement, but we saw it in what we just talked about. Zayo’s network is ideally suited to support what’s next. We don’t always know what it is, we don’t always know exactly what it looks like. But when you’ve got the bandwidth, when you’ve got the reach, when you’ve got the depth, it enables our customers to have confidence that they’ve got a partner that will be able to meet their needs down the road. And that applies to the edge as well, which is a what’s next thing. Not everybody even defines it in the same way, but our network just happens to be ideally suited for it. We’ve got connectivity directly to the cloud, to the core. And then by virtue of our network build-out, to the edge.

So, we are ideally positioned to help our customers provide connectivity from the edge to the edge if you want. From the edge to the core, from the edge to the cloud, as that manifests over time. And of course, the driver for all this, you mentioned at the very beginning, we discussed tangentially at the very beginning, it’s just network. It’s just communication. It’s just more of it, at a lower latency, higher speed. Applications and computer processing that doesn’t need to be done all the way back in the core or at the cloud, can now be done at the edge where it’s most efficient for that application, for that use-case. And that is the general definition of the edge and how it’s developing.

Edge Technology Manifestation & Problem Solving

Brad:  

What are some of the industries that you guys first tackled? Or at least, maybe with your team you first tackled some of this problem-solving around edge technology and making sure latency was held to an absolute minimum while we were transitioning into this whole new world of work-from-home and such like that.

Dennis Kyle:

Well, some of it’s still happening right now. Some of it’s new, some of it some of your listeners may categorize as pie in the sky, but it’s happening now. We see a lot of the edge manifesting in places like, believe it or not, retail or manufacturing or distribution. A couple of cases that come to mind, if you are a shopper in stores that are available today, rather than going to a cash register to check out. You have a bag, you pick up a product, you put it in that bag, and there’s a video camera that’s analyzing the barcode associated with that. Your credit cards are on file. You walk out. And the need to do that analytics and processing locally, so that it’s done quickly and accurately, is an example of the edge. Another example is in a manufacturing facility.

You may have robots delivering pieces and parts to different parts of the assembly line, which must be done in real-time, must be done with low latency. There is an edge application. Or a distribution center, where similarly you’ve now got another set of robots or robots may be mixed with people. People are wearing AR glasses to identify what’s in a bin so that they can pick it up and package it up. You’ve got robots doing the same thing. All of those are various types of edge applications. And then, of course, you’ve got the still to come, but always out there as the primary example of edge processing, autonomous vehicles. Who must interact with the infrastructure in a real-time way, zero latency, or near-zero latency type of way, otherwise you’re going to hit somebody? Those are real-world edge applications, that are in process of being developed, some further than the others. AV has a way to go. You’d be very surprised at how much it’s being used today in distribution and manufacturing centers.

Brad:

When we spoke initially, we talked a little bit about healthcare too. Obviously, that’s a huge market and driver for you guys. I recently had an experience where I had to communicate with a doctor, and normally you’d go into an appointment. Obviously, things are opening a little more now. However, now there are apps for me to communicate with that doctor. I can send the information to a doctor’s assistant. I basically can be at home, on my phone, and communicating with that doctor now that the need has been for those hospitals and doctor’s offices, they’re building software now in the middle to communicate better and just in a more productive way.

Dennis Kyle:

Absolutely.

Broadband Infrastructure and Telehealth

Brad:

It’s fascinating to me how something like that is now affected in healthcare. And just over the last two years, they’ve completely shifted that paradigm to working remotely and telehealth. Can you explain some of the things you guys are doing in telehealth today?

Dennis Kyle:

I was at a conference or a session in Miami this week with a partner of ours, and they were describing there are telehealth applications like you have like you were just describing, which are increasing in prevalence. I had knee surgery late last year and my final consultation with the doctor after everything had been done was done via a variation of a Zoom or Google Meet call. I don’t remember what it was, but we certainly did that. So, there is that example. Then there’s the… Oh boy, you better get this right type of example, where there are surgeries being done and there is a need to transfer a scan of someone’s brain very quickly, very accurately into the surgical room. And we were joking at the time, well, somebody’s brain may only be 10 gigabytes, somebody else’s maybe a 100. I’ll let you decide whose is whose. But that is tremendous amounts of bandwidth, accurately transmitting data in a very real-time fashion for supporting things that we never would’ve thought of 10, 20 years ago.

Brad:

Wow. Shifting just a little bit to a different industry, I had seen something locally here in the last year in terms of restaurants. And I think you shared an example with me of a Chipotle near you. I think what you said was it never actually opened its doors or had a customer, but it was fully functioning.

Dennis Kyle: 

Yes, it was. It is a store nearby. They had plans to open as normal Chipotles do during… I guess somewhere during COVID, and they had to adapt. They went to a mobile-only Chipotle. While it’s a full physical store, with workers inside preparing the burritos. My initial exposure was, I went there assuming that it was like other scenarios, you either go in the store to grab your Chipotle order and grab your Chipotle, or you go through the drive-through line. It turns out, you can’t do that at this location. Instead, what you must do is order ahead via the mobile app. That’s yet another application of technology changing the way things work. And there were… I think the first time I went there, I ended up waiting in the parking lot while I put in my mobile order, which was a little bit inconvenient.

But then after that, I figured it out. And this entire store now operates that way. It’s a very popular location here where I live, just outside of Boulder. And that’s how they are continuing to go to market, because it’s efficient for them, it’s efficient for the customers. Even after COVID now has at least given us a reprieve of nothing else. So, some of these business models that we have now delved into, COVID or not, will continue. We’re looking at going back to work here at Zayo and we’re recognizing that we may not go back in the office anytime soon, if ever, for five days a week. We will be, what we call hybrid. I’m sure all your listeners have heard of this. That workspace is forever changed likely, just like Chipotle, that Chipotle location.

Brad: 

We’re all experiencing that. It’s fascinating to me when you mention that. That restaurant had never had a customer walk into it, only walk up to the front door, and get their food.

Dennis Kyle:

And try and open the door, like an old Far Side commercial or Far Side cartoon where it said pull for gifted students and they’re pushing. That’s what I felt like, for those of you who might remember that. Those types of things will continue to manifest here. What’s interesting behind it is, that having the right network is truly what makes it happen. There are no if and or buts.

Brad:

Absolutely agree. We can see as networks transform and we go through more recently digital transformation, obviously even industries like, I think you and I spoke briefly about farming. Another edge application where you talked about harvesting done by digital tool stets… Digital toolsets, excuse me. Harvesting the crops and various weather information that we’re getting in near real-time. All the farm equipment and how key that is to these farmers to do that work. Can you share a little bit about a use case or an example like that?

Dennis Kyle:

Yeah. You and I talked about it. What was that? Maybe 30 days ago. I will also reference it just so you know I didn’t make it up. It came up again in the session I was down in Miami at, where a use-case where you’d be surprised unless you’re close to it. Farmers are working on automating their entire process via a wireless connection that obviously covers the acreage of the farm. Automated harvesting, planting, and nurturing equipment that can take soil samples as it does its work. Identify what needs to be placed in the soil, analyze the condition of the food stock, what needs to be done to better nurture it, whatever that may be. And all of this is being done as the vehicles are moving throughout the crops. That is yet another example of what wouldn’t necessarily come to mind off the top of your head as an edge application.

But most folks would describe that as a combination of wireless and edge being used in agriculture to create a better, more robust harvest based on a constant flow of analytics that you wouldn’t even have imagined was possible 10 years ago. And now suddenly is. And again, you’ve got moving devices, moving equipment, you’re going to need a low latency type of infrastructure to support that. That’s usually where you end up defining that as an edge application because you’re not going to back all that data to the cloud or the core for analysis. It takes too long. You’re going to do it right there, locally.

Brad:

Fascinating. I love hearing bits and pieces and details about all the different markets you guys are in and use-cases to see how you’re trying to drive innovation here.

Dennis Kyle:

Yeah, and what shocks me is how real this is. We’ve been talking about it forever and then you turn around and you realize some innovative company is already putting this to use.

Brad:

Absolutely. Well, it’s interesting all the gathering of information now in near real-time, reading and analysis of that so humans and even machines can make better decisions immediately. Now, as you enable your next-gen innovation in technology, you mentioned you’re always trying to stay ahead of the curve and service the next thing, whatever that thing is. Where does Zayo go from here? What do you see as drivers five years from now?

Broadband Infrastructure and 5G

Dennis Kyle:

Again, things that maybe some people will imagine as a pie in the sky. But again, I’ll argue what’s happening right now, whether it’s augmented reality, or virtual reality, those things are real. Being used today and will continue to grow and continue to need a network to support them. Additional edge applications that we haven’t even thought of, we used a few examples in retail and agricultural, manufacturing, distribution, and even autonomous vehicles. But there’ll be things that develop that are still something that we haven’t thought of. Traffic, I guess is one that we’ve perhaps thought of, but traffic management on the part of cities and municipalities.

Water management, all those different types of things are going to benefit from continued investments in the infrastructure. We believe it’s where the network needs to be. Sometimes you end up throwing terms like 5G into that yet another set of nomenclature that helps folks envision the future. 5G, obviously being a wireless technology. I like to remind people that behind all those wires or wireless technologies are an awful lot of wires, and today’s wires are of course fiber. So, all those applications are going to end up being supported by fiber infrastructure at some point as well.

Brad:

It’s amazing. When I bought my first iPhone, I remember there was a little 3G next to it, next to the top in the corner. Being in the business, I knew what that meant. Now, there’s a 5G up in that little corner, depending on where I am. However, our speed and capacity haven’t just doubled. I would say, at this point, probably it’s hundreds of times more than it was back when we were working with a 3G network, would you say?

Dennis Kyle:

A 100%. When you get into data sets and you really think about it, I’ll use one of the descriptors we used before, an automated vehicle, an autonomous vehicle that needs to send data on a constant basis back out to the network. That is itself the equivalent of 500 iPhones. That future autonomous vehicle is like 500 iPhones running around. So, you could not support that type of speed, capacity, and throughput with… What was the G you mentioned? 2G? I think you mentioned two or 3G.

Brad:

3G, But I do remember two also.

Dennis Kyle:

And I remember analog, back in the McCaw Cellular day.

Brad:

Oh, wow.

Dennis Kyle:

All of that is the reality. When you’re moving that much data and need to do so with speed and clarity, you need a network that will support it. And certainly, 5G is part of that, at the point of attack. But then behind that, you’ve got to transmit that data to where it needs to go, whether it’s the edge, the core, or the cloud.

Brad:

Great. Dennis, as we wrap up here, I wanted to thank you for coming on and sharing so much information with us. I think this is so pertinent to everything that’s going on, especially all the federal dollars that we’re seeing coming into broadband and new networks and innovation and software and things like that. It’s just so relevant. Before we go, I always ask a question of our guests in… What we call it is our Back to the Future question.

If you had your DeLorean, if you had your time machine, DeLorean, you could go back in time before you started your journey into telecommunications, technology, connected device, management, IoT, all that. Is there anything you would change?

Dennis Kyle:

I’ll make a joke. It’s a bit open-ended. I would make sure it wasn’t a DeLorean because they were slow. And as a closet car guy, I would not drive a DeLorean, but that’s just me.

Brad: 

Is there anything that you would want to know back then that would’ve helped you in your journey? If you could go back and speak to yourself through that time machine in the DeLorean.

Dennis Kyle:

Boy. Most folks know that telecommunications went through a period of saturation where it felt like we’d overbuilt the network. Everybody had put too much fiber in the ground, prices were being compressed. And it wasn’t a good place to be. What I would’ve told myself is, the good thing… And this goes back to the question that you had early on, around technology and the like. Our ability to consume technology, consume communications, to consume networks is unparalleled. And I think what I would tell myself is always bet on the positive outcome associated with technology adoption. People will absorb it, people will gravitate towards it, and always put it to good use and to good advantage. I think that is probably what I would tell myself because there were some days where… Most folks don’t remember when we were thinking, oh boy, I think we all picked the wrong industry. And that just did not end up being the case.

Brad:

At times, it does feel like you were continuing to learn every day and you can never quite catch up to the knowledge that you need.

Dennis Kyle:  

That’s right. That is exactly right.

Brad:

Wow.

Dennis Kyle:

I think that’s why probably… Something like that.

Brad:

Well, Dennis, I want to thank you for coming on the show today and sharing all your stories and Zayo’s growth as well as your journey and a lot of the use-cases. I would love to invite you back within the next six to 12 months and maybe even get an update on the industry. I know as news is constantly happening around the globe, our parameters sometimes change, and new paradigms are formed. Would love to hear from you on a consistent basis if you’d agree to do something like that for us.

Dennis Kyle:

I’d love to. I certainly engage and love conversations like this when you’re thinking about where things have been, and where things are going. Like we like to say, what’s next? It’s why I’m in the role I’m in. So, love to participate.

Brad:

Perfect. Well, Dennis, this has been a phenomenal visit. Looking forward to the next time we can catch up on some of the exciting stuff that you and Zayo are doing. Really great stuff.

Dennis Kyle:  

Thank you very much.

Brad:

Well, that’s going to be a wrap on this episode. On behalf of everyone here, I’m Brad Hine. We’ll see you next time, right here on The Broadband Bunch. So long, everyone.